Family of couple whose grave was dug up by ex-Royal Marine Wayne Joselyn slam his 15-month sentence

Family of ‘loving, sweet’ couple whose grave was dug up by drug addict ex-Royal Marine searching for firearms and jewellery pay tribute to the pair – and slam his 15-month sentence

The family of a ‘really loving’ couple whose grave was dug up by a drug addict ex-Royal Marine looking for cash have paid tribute to them after he was sentenced.

Kell and Maud Goodwin’s resting place was dug up by Wayne Joselyn, 43, in April last year after he heard a ‘bizarre rumour’ that a plot at the cemetery contained money.

The couple had been buried together since 1984 when Maud died at the age of 78 and was buried next to Kell, who passed away when he was 80 in 1982.

But on May 2, a member of the public who visited the cemetery to tend to their own relative’s plot was left horrified after finding the Goodwin’s grave had been disturbed.

Kell and Maud Goodwin’s (pictured) grave was dug up by Wayne Joselyn, 43, in April last year after he heard a rumour that a plot at the cemetery contained money

The ex-Marine, 43, was sentenced to 15 months in jail to run consecutively to the sentence he is already serving on January 20 at Sheffield Crown Court

The ex-Marine, 43, was sentenced to 15 months in jail to run consecutively to the sentence he is already serving on January 20 at Sheffield Crown Court

Police then launched an investigation which revealed that Joselyn was the person who dug up the grave in Carlton Cemetery in Barnsley, South Yorkshire.

Sheffield Crown Court heard how Joselyn had gone out in the early hours of the morning armed with a number of shovels and spades to dig into the grave – disturbing Kell and Maud Goodwin’s remains. 

He was sentenced to 15 months in jail to run consecutively to the sentence he is already serving on January 20 at Sheffield Crown Court.

Joselyn previously pleaded guilty to criminal damage and a further count of outraging public decency and common law.

Maud and Kell’s family have now paid tribute to the ‘really loving’ couple, who they said was the ‘rock of our family.’

In a statement released by police, the family said: ‘It broke our hearts. We’re still stuck for words now.

Joselyn asked a friend to burn his boots and clothes after burrowing into a grave shared Maud Goodwin and her husband, Kell in the Carlton Cemetary, Barnsley, during April last year

 Joselyn asked a friend to burn his boots and clothes after burrowing into a grave shared Maud Goodwin and her husband, Kell in the Carlton Cemetary, Barnsley, during April last year

For 11 days the grave was regarded as a crime scene while a forensic anthropologist, archaeologist and CSI teams seized soil and evidence

After a member of the public visiting the cemetery to visit their own relative discovered the chilling scene, the Goodwin’s disturbed grave was regarded as a crime scene

‘The memories we have of them are that they were really loving, they were just so sweet.

‘They were so lovely to us and always there for us.

‘They were the rock of our family and raised some of us – and for those members of the family they made it a gorgeous world to grow up in.

‘We really loved them.

‘As a family we don’t feel the sentence reflects the significance of the intrusion on Maud and Kell, the impact on us, nor the work put in by South Yorkshire Police, who have not just worked tirelessly on this case but also shown so much compassion.

‘They have gone above and beyond their job description throughout.’

Phone tracking showed that Joselyn was there at the believed time of the incident, while further enquiries found he had ordered a taxi to a friend's house using his real name

Joselyn managed to get into Maud’s coffin, and the experts spent days sieving through soil carried by buckets into the nearby ‘sieving tent’ and piecing every fragment of bone back together

Speaking after sentencing, Detective constable Toni Wain said: ‘As a family liaison officer it is my job to be a link between the family and the investigation team and gather information.

‘I have seen first-hand how this disturbing crime has affected the family both emotionally and psychologically.

‘They have handled it with such dignity, strength and patience while the investigation was ongoing.

‘I am pleased we were able to get justice for the family but that does not mean their sorrow ends now.

‘This is a time where the family can finally process what has happened and grieve once again.

‘I am privileged to have supported the family though this life-changing process and I thank them for the trust they have shown; to me and the whole team.’

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