US Military Probing Blood Cancer Incidents Among Nuclear Silo Crews

https://sputniknews.com/20230123/us-military-probing-disproportionate-number-of-blood-cancer-incidents-among-nuclear-silo-crews-1106608694.html

US Military Probing ‘Disproportionate Number’ of Blood Cancer Incidents Among Nuclear Silo Crews

US Military Probing ‘Disproportionate Number’ of Blood Cancer Incidents Among Nuclear Silo Crews

US Military probing blood cancer incidents among nuclear silo crews at Malmstrom Air Force Base.

2023-01-23T14:33+0000

2023-01-23T14:33+0000

2023-01-23T14:33+0000

americas

us

montana

cancer

us air force

per- and polyfluorinated substances (pfas)

toxic chemicals

firefighters

/html/head/meta[@name=”og:title”]/@content

/html/head/meta[@name=”og:description”]/@content

https://cdnn1.img.sputniknews.com/img/07e7/01/17/1106608252_0:119:3223:1931_1920x0_80_0_0_c741ba7c4bfaf94c8bebd49a25bb49d9.jpg

The US military is carrying out a probe into the “disproportionate number” of missileers – military combat crews staffing nuclear launch complexes – diagnosed with blood cancer.There are “indications” the disease may be linked to their service, according to a US report citing military briefing slides. Nine officers who had been part of such crews as far back as 25 years ago at a nuclear missile base in Montana have been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, according to a January briefing by US Space Force Lt. Col. Daniel Sebeck. One of the officers has since died, the report added. One of three bases in the US that house 400 Minutemen III intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), Malmstrom Air Force Base has 150 such silos. Other ICBMs are hosted by Minot Air Force Base in North Dakota and F.E. Warren Air Force Base in Wyoming.Officers who are part of a combat crew (MCC) operate underground missile systems and are sometimes required to stay in concrete and steel-encased bunkers for days.Sebeck also clarified that at least 455 former missileers were currently serving as Space Force officers. Among them were reportedly at least four of the nine officers diagnosed with blood cancer shown in the slides.Commenting on the issue, Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek acknowledged that “senior leaders are aware of the concerns raised about the possible association of cancer related to missile combat crew members at Malmstrom AFB.” The spokeswoman added that the information “had been shared with the Department of the Air Force surgeon general and our medical professionals are working to gather data and understand more.”A type of cancer that develops in the lymphatic system, part of the immune system, non-Hodgkin lymphoma affects an estimated 19 out of every 100,000 people in the US annually, as per the American Cancer Society.One of the reasons for the concerns is also the fact that the most common age factor connected with incidents of adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma is 67, as per National Institutes of Health. However, all of the former missileers diagnosed with the cancer are reportedly much younger.Furthermore, the military had previously been warned of multiple cancer cases diagnosed among Malmstrom’s officers. As far back as in 2001, when 14 cancers, including two cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, were discovered among missileers who had served at Malmstrom AFB, the Air Force Institute for Operational Health waded in to carry out a probe.However, at the time, the review dispelled concerns, concluding that the base was environmentally safe and that “sometimes illnesses tend to occur by chance alone.”Cancer-Causing ChemicalsOver the past few years, a spate of reports have thrown light on concerning incidents of cancer diagnosed among those who were deployed at several American military bases, with veterans’ associations signaling alarm and demanding answers.Thus, a report from the Department of Defense and analysis from the Environmental Working Group found that PFAS – a large group of man-made chemicals that are ingredients in everyday products and dubbed “forever chemicals,” resistant to biodegradation, were present in drinking water at military bases around the United States. PFAS can accumulate in the human body, potentially causing cancer.At 24 bases, PFAS were found to be 70 parts-per-trillion (ppt) or more in the drinking water, the study said, while Environmental Protection Agency rules limited them at one ppt for PFAS. The environmental nonprofit said at least 400 of America’s military installations, both inside the US and overseas, were discovered to have PFAS contamination in drinking water supplies.A greater part of the PFAS pollution at military installations was believed to be the result of firefighting foam made with the chemicals. Furthermore, it was underscored that the DOD has known of the health problems PFAS can cause since the 1970s, but continued to use them, while military firefighters were not informed of the risks posed by PFAS chemicals until 2015, the environmental nonprofit stated.In 2020, a Pentagon report presented to the US House Armed Services Committee went as far as to identify 401 active and Base Closure and Realignment installations in the US where at least one area contained a “known or suspected release of perfluorinated compounds.”The report revealed that 36 sites had contamination of drinking water, and more than 90 sites reported water source having tested above the Environmental Protection Agency’s acceptable levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOS & PFOAs.)

https://sputniknews.com/20220907/us-test-launches-minuteman-iii-missile-to-show-nuclear-force-readiness-air-force-1100491052.html

https://sputniknews.com/20220826/epa-to-designate-pfas-forever-chemicals-as-hazardous-substances-compel-companies-to-report-spills-1100045779.html

https://sputniknews.com/20220505/pentagon-temporarily-stops-incineration-of-forever-chemicals-1095291278.html

americas

montana

2023

News

en_EN

Sputnik International

feedback@sputniknews.com

+74956456601

MIA „Rosiya Segodnya“

https://cdnn1.img.sputniknews.com/img/07e7/01/17/1106608252_245:0:2976:2048_1920x0_80_0_0_9be98d7440c60a8852f549717ab15ebd.jpg

us military probe, blood cancer incidents, nuclear silo crews, malmstrom air force base, disproportionate number, officers staffing nuclear launch complexes, diagnosed with blood cancer, non-hodgkin lymphoma, disease may be linked to their service, minuteman iii intercontinental ballistic missile silos,

us military probe, blood cancer incidents, nuclear silo crews, malmstrom air force base, disproportionate number, officers staffing nuclear launch complexes, diagnosed with blood cancer, non-hodgkin lymphoma, disease may be linked to their service, minuteman iii intercontinental ballistic missile silos,

Concerns have been raised about possible links between cancer incidents and work at nuclear silos at Malmstrom Air Force Base as far back as in 2001, when 14 officers who had been stationed there were diagnosed with various types of cancers, including two cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

The US military is carrying out a probe into the “disproportionate number” of missileers – military combat crews staffing nuclear launch complexes – diagnosed with blood cancer.

There are “indications” the disease may be linked to their service, according to a US report citing military briefing slides. Nine officers who had been part of such crews as far back as 25 years ago at a nuclear missile base in Montana have been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, according to a January briefing by US Space Force Lt. Col. Daniel Sebeck. One of the officers has since died, the report added.

One of three bases in the US that house 400 Minutemen III intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), Malmstrom Air Force Base has 150 such silos. Other ICBMs are hosted by Minot Air Force Base in North Dakota and F.E. Warren Air Force Base in Wyoming.

Officers who are part of a combat crew (MCC) operate underground missile systems and are sometimes required to stay in concrete and steel-encased bunkers for days.

“There are indications of a possible association between cancer and missile combat crew service at Malmstrom AFB,” Sebeck was cited as saying in slides presented to the Space Force, adding that the “disproportionate number of missileers presenting with cancer, specifically lymphoma” was concerning.

Sebeck also clarified that at least 455 former missileers were currently serving as Space Force officers. Among them were reportedly at least four of the nine officers diagnosed with blood cancer shown in the slides.

Commenting on the issue, Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek acknowledged that “senior leaders are aware of the concerns raised about the possible association of cancer related to missile combat crew members at Malmstrom AFB.”

The spokeswoman added that the information “had been shared with the Department of the Air Force surgeon general and our medical professionals are working to gather data and understand more.”

A type of cancer that develops in the lymphatic system, part of the immune system, non-Hodgkin lymphoma affects an estimated 19 out of every 100,000 people in the US annually, as per the American Cancer Society.

In this photo provided by U.S. Air Force, an unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile launches during an operational test on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016 at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. - Sputnik International, 1920, 07.09.2022

US Test Launches Minuteman III Missile to Show Nuclear Force Readiness: Air Force

One of the reasons for the concerns is also the fact that the most common age factor connected with incidents of adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma is 67, as per National Institutes of Health. However, all of the former missileers diagnosed with the cancer are reportedly much younger.

Furthermore, the military had previously been warned of multiple cancer cases diagnosed among Malmstrom’s officers. As far back as in 2001, when 14 cancers, including two cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, were discovered among missileers who had served at Malmstrom AFB, the Air Force Institute for Operational Health waded in to carry out a probe.

However, at the time, the review dispelled concerns, concluding that the base was environmentally safe and that “sometimes illnesses tend to occur by chance alone.”

Officials with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) knew about poisonous lead in the tap water in Flint, Michigan, as early as April, and did nothing about it. - Sputnik International, 1920, 26.08.2022

EPA to Designate PFAS ‘Forever Chemicals’ as Hazardous Substances, Compel Companies to Report Spills

Cancer-Causing Chemicals

Over the past few years, a spate of reports have thrown light on concerning incidents of cancer diagnosed among those who were deployed at several American military bases, with veterans’ associations signaling alarm and demanding answers.

Thus, a report from the Department of Defense and analysis from the Environmental Working Group found that PFAS – a large group of man-made chemicals that are ingredients in everyday products and dubbed “forever chemicals,” resistant to biodegradation, were present in drinking water at military bases around the United States. PFAS can accumulate in the human body, potentially causing cancer.

At 24 bases, PFAS were found to be 70 parts-per-trillion (ppt) or more in the drinking water, the study said, while Environmental Protection Agency rules limited them at one ppt for PFAS. The environmental nonprofit said at least 400 of America’s military installations, both inside the US and overseas, were discovered to have PFAS contamination in drinking water supplies.

A greater part of the PFAS pollution at military installations was believed to be the result of firefighting foam made with the chemicals. Furthermore, it was underscored that the DOD has known of the health problems PFAS can cause since the 1970s, but continued to use them, while military firefighters were not informed of the risks posed by PFAS chemicals until 2015, the environmental nonprofit stated.

In 2020, a Pentagon report presented to the US House Armed Services Committee went as far as to identify 401 active and Base Closure and Realignment installations in the US where at least one area contained a “known or suspected release of perfluorinated compounds.”

The report revealed that 36 sites had contamination of drinking water, and more than 90 sites reported water source having tested above the Environmental Protection Agency’s acceptable levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOS & PFOAs.)

The Pentagon - Sputnik International, 1920, 05.05.2022

Pentagon Temporarily Halts Incineration of ‘Forever Chemicals’

Leave a Comment